Wednesday, November 30, 2016

"NINA NEEDS TO GO" AN EXAMPLE OF EVERYTHING WRONG WITH SOCIETY

1. Deal with things when they become a problem rather than try to prevent them. How about Nina goes to the bathroom before she leaves the house, or before the family starts doing whatever it's doing.

2. The parents are whipped. Rather than asking, how about insist Nina use the bathroom.

3. No matter how badly you screw up and no matter how much that screwing up is your own fault, someone will always come along and bail you out.

4. Break rules if you have to in order to get what you want or need.

5. There are no consequences. Nina never fails to make it to the bathroom, thus having an accident and being embarrassed.

6. There's no real expectation of change. You can't keep saying "Never gonna do that again" and "Now I know" and yet keep doing the same stupid thing over and over and over again.

This show is co-created with Pullups in hopes that children will emulate Nina and start wetting their pants again, causing you to give up on toilet training altogether and keep your kids in diapers forever.

Monday, November 21, 2016

Sunday, November 20, 2016

JUST LAY SOME BEER MATS OVER THE SAWDUST

Regarding the recent article in Maclean's about diaper changing tables in men's washrooms, this is another strong argument for unisex washrooms. Incidentally, why isn't the three year old mentioned in the article toilet trained?

There are many additional reasons there should be unisex washrooms:

Elderly people with opposite sex caregivers: As the population of senior citizens rises, this is going to become more common. It is also somewhat likely most of the caregivers will be feamale, so having a unisex washroom would be a good way a female nurse could care for an elderly male patient without having to be concerned about which washroom to take him into;

People with special needs who have opposite sex caregivers: Again, the population of disabled people is rising and many of these people will need help in the bathroom. Just as with the scenario above, a good way to take care of things without having to wonder about which washroom to use;

daddies with little girls: Even after a child gets out of diapers, they will need help with toileting, probably for a few years after toilet training. Unisex washrooms are a good idea in this case for all the reasons cited in the article;

Couples: Personally, I would rather go to the bathroom in front of my wife or girlfriend to whom I am deeply committed than with a bunch of strange guys;

Dads with a bunch of young kids of both sexes: If you have both boys and girls in your charge who are of the age where they need help toileting, you can't exactly take the boys into the men's room and let the girls go into the women's room by themselves. Of course, you could get a friendly female passerby to help but some people wouldn't be comfortable with doing this.

It is good to see so many places now with unisex washrooms as well as places that don't exactly enforce the MEN or WOMEN sign on their bathroom doors. Hopefully this trend grows, making things a lot easier and much less awkward for fathers and others everywhere.

Saturday, November 19, 2016

CHANGING TAB-STYLE ABSORBANT PROTECTIVE UNDERWEAR IS THE HARDEST PART OF MY JOB

I could not agree more heartily with this woman. Take that, political correctness.

SOME PEOPLE ARE DUMB-THE MANUFACTURERS OF PULLUPS (OR SHOULD THAT BE PULL-UPS)

("Some People Are Dumb" is a well-beloved feature of the Alex Horton Blog and is based on a line from the classic film "Beavis and Butt-head do America.")

When it first came out in the eighties, the idea behind them was to make a fifty gallon drum full of money by extending the diaper wearing age. The idea which was a front for this was that, if a child just learning to use the toilet had a disposable garment that would absorb accidents to a high degree, this would help the child toilet train faster and save parents (overwhelmingly mothers back in them days) the extra work of having to wash soiled underwear or cloth training pants. However, as countless toddlers have demonstrated, this product got used just like a diaper instead.

The marketing of these products as "just like big kid underwear" with the trademark jingle "Mommy, wow, I'm a physically more mature human at this present time" was put forth by people who clearly don't understand little children. Toddlers don't grasp nuances. Yes, to you, Mom, and to you, sleezy diaper company executive, these concoctions of paper and faux-cloth plastic do indeed seem like real underwear and, granted, are capable of being pulled up and down by little ones. Thing is, the kiddos don't see it that way. To them these objects feel and, they discover, work just like diapers. They're not capable of understanding "This is like a diaper only because it's meant to help if I have an accident, but I'm supposed to poop and pee in the potty now."

Granted, there have been some situations in which these disposable training pants have worked, but I'll talk about those in another post. For now, please enjoy reading my name and the date and time this was posted.

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

"SOMEDAY YOU'LL LOOK BACK ON THIS..."

This is so heartening. It's moments like this you remember most as a parent; not the things you think you'll remember

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

YES, SHE DOES POO HERE OFTEN

Regarding the article in Maclean's a few weeks back about parents having parties to encourage their kids to toilet train, don't let it get to that point.

Monday, November 14, 2016

TO TAKE THEIR WORD FOR IT OR NOT

One tip for toilet training suggested by people is to take a child's word for it when they say they don't need to go to the bathroom. It is said this will help the child become aware of their need. It is argued too many parents mess up toilet training by insisting the child use the bathroom which in turn causes the child to second guess whether he or she needs to go and actually delays independent use of the toilet. Thus, if your child says no, pretend like you're taking their word for it, even if you know they're going to wet their pants in ten minutes.

I can see merit for this way of thinking. However, there are times when you can't afford to deal with wet pants and you must insist on the child using the bathroom, such as if you didn't bring exstra clothes, you're in a situation where it isn't easy to change clothes, or there is something more to the child saying they don't need to go, such as fear of using a public washroom.